A snail’s world: Under Mischenko’s lens


It was supposed to be just another day of digging in my favorite boredom-buster site, Bored Panda.  

Topics, sometimes, take too much time to mature, to develop into one full cohesive article.  In which case, I will either pull my butt out the chair, or visit my top online sites:

a) Pinterest

b) Harvard Business Review blog

c) Salon

d) Behance

e) Bored Panda

For that particular idle hour, I took to checking out letter e.  I was clicking and drifting through interesting compilations of photography and milk-box art.  Then, I came across those snails.

Slimy things, shelled creatures.  We all call them snails.  (Okay, are you thinking of Disney’s Turbo now?)

Ooops…not that!

Let’s go back to the featured works of Ukrainian nature photographer, Vyacheslav Mischenko.

….

My fascination with these creatures had nothing to do with their cuteness.  Besides, while they are tiny, I have regrettably came across bigger ones that came to take a ‘walk’ into concrete streets – only to be smashed into smithereens by motorcycles and automobiles.

Perhaps, the crux of my interest in snails had something to do with childhood memories.  Yes, that’s it.  As a child, we all have this encounters with spiders, butterflies, grasshoppers, frogs and their tadpoles, and snails.  They’re virtually everywhere – particularly, in areas teeming with lush green and tiny droplets of moist.

And while these encounters are not exactly fairy-tale-ish (consider Little Miss Muffet’s misadventure), they were essential in our introduction to another world.  Theirs is probably, smaller – but that’s obviously just about OUR perspective.

Besides, how many movies that featured morphed tiny-humans have we seen?  Thumbelina.  Honey, I Shrunk the Kids.  I think you’ve got better movie fares to offer for this category…

In Mischenko’s work, I saw their world.  They were surrounded by luscious textures of flora and fauna.  They were embraced by nature: near the water, atop branches, hanging on dear life!

The photos show that while their blob-bodies carry weight, gravity never fails them.  They are able to balance themselves, though I can only imagine the kind of headache a blowing wind would cause.

And then I began to ask, do these creatures feel pain?  Okay, they sure do, but how?  Do they experience vertigo?  Or are they pretty much used to it?  Perhaps, this site called snail-world.com could help?

Wow… In my quest to drown boredom, I ended up revisiting fond memories.  Well, off I go to the snail’s world!

 

 

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One thought on “A snail’s world: Under Mischenko’s lens

  1. Pingback: What the Four-Month Blogger Wants to Say | jandelaforce

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